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20121201
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was this fabulously learned man who had stayed with history. the reason for the monroe doctrine -- in south america the various countries were beginning to rebel against the spanish king, and the french king was a cousin of the spanish king and the french were going to send military aid to put out these barbarians of english and they send their military to keep the french from going into south america. and they invited the americans to join them in keeping the french out of south america because obviously south america was rich with gold and silver, and john quincy adams was the secretary of state and said absolutely not. we are not going to get involved in a foreign war. we are not going to let them come over here either. and that was the seed planted for the shooting of the monroe doctrine. monroe doctrine wasn't a separate doctrine. was a part of lonrho's message and he asked his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement making our international policy clear. and john quincy adams wrote the core provision of that. there were three long paragraphs that now are called the monroe
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
think i'm still recovering from the illnesses from south america and kept from the minds and from serving stephenson. he saw the rain had momentarily stopped in the wind had faded away. the lobos a godsend. northeast of san francisco, forfeits of sacramento still lay underwater, permitting a steamer to shuttle up and down streets and allow passengers to enter the second story city hotel room. the 50 inches at icy wind and shotgun blast of black tail that it pummeled san francisco a winter the dreams of its citizens. they tossed in their beds. insight comestible homes, still with nightmares about what happened when the life-saving downpour ended. they were posed in front of their fires, listening to think cockiness equals a paraffin? they watched the clear glass of their lamp chimneys black and instead of being warned, they fear the worst. they dreaded the high winds off the bid of a drive the way to inflame the building in the deeper water wells, flame equipment to buy, at the readiness and cisco woodburn. for years earlier, pittsburgh had been a disastrous on fire. that would com
even south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do you deal with that situation? well, it's not a coincidence that william walker support slavery. so it is to bring african slaves into these areas, some people are talking about how we should inflate central americans themselves. it is a strange and unusual situation. i think that filibustering was uneasy with the us-mexico war. but by no means does this stop americans from starting to get more territory. i think the seeming ease with which the u.s. took the territory embolden expansionist as they we have that much of mexico, sure, we can go to central america, no problem. at the very back? >> [inaudible question] >> okay. >> the first question has to do with the immigrants coming to the united states during the 1840s. they have an opinion or observation about the war, and how did this affect their integration into u.s. society? the second question is montgomery. and in her reporting effect this order this continue to fester the manifest destiny? >> okay, i write a lot about this, and i don't think that her report
the united states encompassing all of central america, canada and even south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do we deal with that situation? it is not a coincidence that william walker supports slavery. his idea, to bring african-american slaves into the area, some people -- enslave central americans themselves. a strange and unusual situation but filibustering is very unusual ending u.s./mexico war. and the seeming ease with which the u.s. took half of mexico's territory emboldened expansionists to say to get that much of mexico we can get central america no problem. [inaudible] >> kind in -- first question is -- has to do with immigrants coming to the united states from the 1840s, did they have an opinion or observation about war, and the integration to u.s. society, the second question is core montgomerie and does reporting affect the national attitudes or does it continue to fester the idea of manifest destiny? >> i read a lot about that. some people are basically implicated -- to go a peace treaty but basically a lot of support for that -- i don't think cor
into the window wheezing, still recovering from the ellis he had contracted out bound from south america in which captain in the minds from serving his friend stevenson. pulling aside the maudlin curtain he saw the rain had momentarily stopped and the wind had faded away. the lull was a godsend. northeast of san francisco four fifths of san francisco lander water permitting a steamer to shuttle up and down the streets and allow passengers to enter their second story city hotel room by window. the 50 inches of ice u.n. and shotgun blasts of black hail that soaked and pummeled san francisco all winter has not dispelled the fitful dreams of its citizens. they tossed in their beds inside combustible homes, heads with nightmares of what would happen when the life-saving downpour halted. they repose in front of their fighters listening to the faint clacking of sinkholes in which snakelike hits, they watch the clear glass of the lamp chimneys black and. instead of being warmed the feared the worst. they dreaded the high winds that would drive the soak wood to in flammability and with neither water wells
, which countries do you envision south america, africa, you wrote about india obviously. in to be applied in and share our objectives? >> interesting brazil has carved out the identity. they always have trouble making arrangements to do missions of brazil. they are more standoffish. because of geography in west africa over the force of a decade so brazil would not be cost file to the united states but it would be independent with its own point* of view. says that may lead to argentina and develop their balance against brazil. it is strategic about the united states has gotten since the cold wear to asia -- from the rise of the cold war. it has been over hyped but within ds 2012 it is the enormous development. of the indian policy establishment would reject it like a diseased germ. with india aware it is on the map with the economic and military rise is against china. we should not get concessions but anchorage development in a way that we can. >> with your presentation of your book with the u.s. and everything here is absolutely clear. speenine. [laughter] could you talk about israel? a c
'd contracted outbound from south america and which kept him from the mines and from serving his friend, stevenson. pulling aside the muslim curtain, he saw the wind had stopped. the lull was a godsend. northeast of san francisco four-fifths of sacramento still lay underwater permitting a steamer to shuttle up and down its streets and allow passengers to enter their second-story city hotel room by window. the 50 inches of icy wind and shotgun blasts of black hail that had soaked and pummeled san francisco all winter had not dispelled the fitful dreams of it citizens. its citizens. they tossed in their beds inside combustible homes, heads filled with nightmares of what would happen when the lifesaving downpour halted. they reposed in front of their fires listening to the faint quacking of seagulls and snakelike hiss of pair fin. instead of being warmed, they feared the worst. they dreaded the high winds off the bay that would drive the wood to inflammability. and with neither water wells, nor flame-fighting equipment, nor the inclination to buy any, everybody knew that san francisco woul
of south america. california was eager to go its own way. secession in other words was a tiger that might bite in any direction. andrew johnson of tennessee, great unionist southerner, put it this way. if there is one division of the state, will there not be more than one? wouldn't north america soon be just as fragmented and war prone as europe lacks 33 petty governments, a little aristocracy in common citizen not being able to pass from one state to another without a passport which would result in anarchy? johnson argued that dissolution of the union was quote only be the beginning of endless war. and so near the end of 1862, with his army stalled, his cabinet on the verge of revolt, abraham lincoln took most of the week to work on his annual message to congress. something that gets whitest as much attention in the first two-thirds consist of reports on the various departments of the governmengovernmen t. so you read it and you learn about how many post offices there were in the united states and how much money came into the government and how much one out but then when he gets to the e
the united states in compassing all of central america, canada, perhaps south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do you do with the situation? it's not a coincidence that william walker supports slavery. his ideas to bring african slaves into these areas geared some people talk about perhaps we shouldn't say essential americans themselves. so it's a strange and unusual situation, the filibustering exist very uneasily with the u.s.-mexico war. but by no means at the close of the u.s.-mexican war stop people from territory. i think the ease or seeming ease with which the u.s. tech half of mexico's territory broadens expansionists to say it said was that easy to get that much of mexico, we can get central america no problem. at the very back. >> two questions are forming in my mind. [inaudible] first question has to do with the immigrants coming to the united states during the 1840s. did they have an opinion or observation about the war, and how did it affect their immigration to u.s. society? second question is core of montgomery research reporting affect the national
not thrilled at the prospect of a reunified korea having south korea and america right across the river. this is an area where the chinese could tune themselves up a little. but clearly they are not in love with north korea. >> i can only say china is trying to encourage the transformation of korea and encouraging north korea to follow the same path china has engaged in in the last several, opening up their economy in china has been actively trying to establish free trade zones, encouraging other countries to establish operations in certain areas as a way to try to beef up the north korean economy and hope that that may lessen the isolation of north korea and therefore are influenced their foreign policy and some of their military policies. >> on the outside there. >> what about china's book, continental border with russia? what about china buying to siberia. i'm colonizing siberia, sending out some of these people -- how to separate the united states? how does that worry the united states? actually, china getting stronger unaccounted siberia? >> i haven't heard any proposals for china
in which market participants operate with some local banks in asia, europe and south america signally to u.s. financial institutions they will have to start treating to avoid cftc swap dealer registrations. approach may also encourage foreign break theaters to be similarly expansive as they crossed the regulatory reform machines. second, the cftc's definition of u.s. persons that dictates registration and application of title vii requirements is overly broad and at times they hurt as a result, market participants do not know whether they or their counterparties are or are not u.s. persons and cannot make informed business planes. in addition, the breadth of the definition makes it nearly certain that some market participants will be the u.s. person for the purpose of u.s. regulation and media person, causing unnecessary overlap and potential regulation. third, regarding sequencing, the cftc is chosen to finalize the title vii rules and require compliance with them before specifying. as a result, market participants be significant uncertainty as to oppose me apply. in contrast, the sec reco
't die in eastern europe. they didn't die in africa or south america. they died right here in our own country trying to get all of our people to become participants in a democratic process. and bright now, there is an attempt on the part of several members of the congress, both democrats and republicans to get the posters service to issue a stamp in honor of these three young men. [applause] so we had to organize. we had to mobilize. we had to speak a period we had to speak out. we had to get in trouble, big trouble, necessary trouble. dr. martin luther king junior received a nobel peace prize in december 1964 after president johnson signed the civil rights act in july 1964. dr. curt king had a mini with the president and told him he needed a voting rights act. and president lyndon johnson told dr. king in so many words, we had to get a voting rights back. i just signed the civil rights act. dr. martin luther king jr. came back to atlanta, but with a group of us. my organization was already involved in selma. the only time a person could even attempt to register to vote with the first
were central or south america. they died right here in their own country tried to get all their people to become participated in the democratic process. and right now there is an attempt on the part of several members of congress, both democrats and republicans to get the postal service to issue a stay on in honor of these three young men. [applause] so we had to work in as. we mobilize. we had to speak up, we had to speak out. we had to get in trouble, good trouble, necessary travel. after dark or martin luther king received the nobel peace prize in december 1964, after president johnson signed the civil rights act in july 1964, dr. king had a meeting with the president. when he returned from europe, told him we needed voting rights act. president clinton johnson told dr. king in so many words, we don't have the votes in the congress to get it out of my sight pass. dr. martin luther king junior came back to atlanta, but with a group of us. my organization was already involved. and selma, the harder the bite. the only time a person could even attempt to register to vote for the first a
. when i first became the leader, i took a trip with a number of senators to south america to countries that we american senators had never been to, like bolivia. it was a wonderful trip. it was great for our country and it was good for the senators to learn more about that most important part of the world. i was very fixed on who i wanted to go on that trip with me. but the two i asked to go was judd greg going, new hampshire, who had been chairman of the budget committee; and kent conrad, who was chairman of the budget committee at the time. those two fine senators spent about 18 hours seated side by side, both having tablets to write on and they were working on the number-one issue that they thought was important for this country: what we do about the future of this country economically. and they came up with an idea that was very, very good. it had worked before on closing military bases. madam president, we had military bases that we had been trying to close since world war 1. we couldn't do it. we didn't have the political will to do it. so we had a base-closing commission. with t
 the south, and i think it is an important detail to focus on because those who don't know the history of the involvement tend to dismiss them as they sometimes use america's mercenaries because we paid for a lot of the military hardware and logistics and the troops also tend to focus the various thais engaged in black-market schemes but the behind it is that they were fighting and they were dying for years thailand was sort of carrying out the war they saw as the war in south vietnam. so the casualties are something that we should keep in mind. >> professor ruth, thai-u.s. relations. thai has been an ally for a lon time yet participated in the and world war ii. >> absolutely. date back to the famous example of offering abraham lincoln war for the troubles of the american civil war. the 20th thais were always close u.s. allies and this was intensified it was disrupted war. but then as the cold war pretty
complaints about south korea and america's naval exercises, or the sailor that was detained by japan and taken into custody for a while. do you think that this is essentially china's wise to test the solvency and strength and direction of u.s. japan relations? if you do think it is that, the more provocative question again coming to your own nation strategy because japan is origination but it's an aging nation, it's a shrinking nation. when you look at and one wonders wonders what is japan's strategy in the region with allies and how to keep are so vital and robust when china may be saying when you look at long lines, japan will become less significant over time. we will become more significant over time. if i can add one last element. when president obama's national strategy to -- strategic policy was released, there's one thing we read who said america is undergoing a period of strategic contraction. he may be wrong. i loved her the counter position to that, but they're all of these assessments that this is the time for china to push these boundaries out. and so, what do you take i
casualties -- well, i should say 500 thais died in south vietnam while fighting what we call the veitkong, and it's important to focus on it because they tend to dismiss them as america's mercenaries because we paid for the -- a lot of the military hardware and transportation and lo gist ticks and extry pay that the thai troops received, and we focus on thais engaged in black market schemes, but truth behind it all is that thai soldiers were figging. thai soldiers were dying for four years. thailand was carrying out their war, what they saw as their war in south vietnam so the casualties are something to keep in mind. >> host: professor ruth, thai-u.s. relations, when did they start to really jell? they were an ally for a long time participating in the iraq war and world war ii. >> guest: absolutely. it can date back to king monk and famous example of offering lincoln war elephants for his troubles for the american civil war, but definitely in the 20th century, the thais were always close u.s. ally. i mean, and this is intensified really disrurpted partly during the second war ii, but as
with one another. and i think doing so gives us the history of what strom thurmond's america looks like, and else is rethink not only was going on in the south but was going on in the national conservative political realm as well. rethink and strom thurmond helps us think modern conservatism to a history i think that is too often thurmond is left out of because we only remember him as this kind of cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. let me read you, an excerpt from the introduction. one reason we forget about strom thurmond is because he was so doggone old. right? [laughter] thurmond predated the founding generation of what is commonly understood as the modern conservative movement. he was the closest friend to william f. buckley senior and william f. buckley, jr., the founding editor of "national review" and one of the central figures of modern conservatism. buckley senior be restored in india government state in camden south carolina became a friend and regular correspondent with the then governor thurmond would have had no problem identifying as a strom thurmond american. i
of the controversy? that would still be sacred ground. 100 miles north, a thousand miles south, 2000 miles west. it's all holy. i believe every inch of america is sacred from sea to shining sea. i believe we make it wholly by who we welcome and the how we relate to each other. call it my muslim eyes on the american project. we made you different nations and tribes that you may come to know which other says the chronic there's no better place on earth in america to enact that vision. it is part of the definition of our nation. i say democracy is only of use their that if they pass on an come to its fruit and manners in the highest forms of interaction between men and their beliefs and religion, literature, schools same witness. moralism is not a birthright of america. it's a responsibility. pluralism does not fall from the sky. it does not rise up from the ground. people have fought for pluralism. people have kept the promise. america is exceptional not because there's magic in our soil, but because there's fierce determination in our citizens. the greatness of america lies not in being more i'm lik
to my state of south dakota. while greater access to the russian market will benefit a wide range of u.s. companies such as manufacturers and service providers, i would be remiss not to point out the enormous opportunity for america's agricultural producers in russia. consider that russia is the world's largest importer of beef on a quantity basis, with imports of nearly $4 billion last year. russia is the fifth -- world's fifth largest importer of pork products as well as the largest importer of dairy products. despite the problems we've encountered recently with respect to to our poultry exports, america remains the largest supplier of poultry to the russian market accounting for 50% last year. under the terms of russia's w.t.o. aaccession in august, it is adhering to w.t.o. rules regarding sanitary and phytosanitary measures. once we've enacted pntr, the united states will have the ability to enforce these commitments through the world trade organization dispute settlement process. it's important to note that our vote on passage of this bill is different than voting on a trade agree
? that would still be sacred ground. 100 miles north, a thousand miles south, 2,000 miles west, it's all holy. i believe every inch of america is sacred from sea to shining sea. i believe we make it wholly by who we welcome and by how we relate to each other, call it my muslim eyes of the american project. we may differ nations in tribes that you may come to know one another. there is no better place on earth and america to enact that vision. it is part of the definition of our nation. i said democracy is only of use that it may pass on and come to its power in fruits and manners in the highest form of interaction between man and belief in religion, literature, college, school. pluralism is not a birthright in america, its responsibility. pluralism does not fall from the sky, it does not rise up from the ground. people have fought for pluralism people have kept the promise. america is exceptional, not because there is magic in our soil, but because there is fierce determination and our citizens. the greatness of america lies not in being more enlightened than any other nation, but rather in h
in chicago health care in our lifetimes. sheila line was born and raised on the south side of chicago, one of three children of irish immigrants who met in america. she attended little flower elementary school. she joined the sisters of mercy in 1953. she earned her master's degree in psychiatric nursing from st. xavier college and an m.b.a. from the university of chicago and served three years as assistant professor at the university of iowa. in 1976 she became mercy hospital's president and c.e.o. in 1991 mayor richard m. daily daily -- daly appointed her health commissioner. the department's responsibilities ran the gamut from inspecting restaurants to monitoring and controlling epidemic and protecting the public against the spread of infectious disease. its clinics received a million patient vichts a year and served as a family doctor to more chicagoans than any other entity. h.i.v. and aids were taking a toll on the city and nation, gay and lesbian groups protested her appointment strongly, fearing she would allow catholic church policies to dictate public health decisions. sister she
efforts. but then out of no, where senator inouye south recognition. he knew that it was trying to get for millions of these young people living in america, a chance to serve their nation and prove their love and become legal in america, become citizens in america. and he took the floor, and i want to read what he said because it touched me. he said: madam president, i wish to step back in history if i may. on december 7, 1941, something terrible happened in hawaiile three weeks later the government hoff the united states declared that all japanese americans, citizens born in the united states or of japanese ancestry were to be considered enemy aliens, at a result, like these undocumented people, they could not put on the uniform of this lan. senator inouye went on to say, i was 17 at the time and naturally i resented this because i loved my country and wanted to put on the uniform to show where my heart stood. but we were denied. so we petitioned the government. the a year later they said, okay. i if you wish to volunteer, go ahead. senator inouye said, well to make a long story shor
-american and the political history still as imagined in the world and it was once described as the mac of america. you described it as a personality passion was the percussive and syncopated rhythms that have become the soundtrack of the burgeoning south side. he was handy with the drums himself and his jazz lover. there was no better place to be in the 1920s than chicago, the epicenter of the nation's blues and jazz recording industry. >> what is lovely actually about writing about chicago in that time was how many luminaries were there. i think langston hughes was wandering through chicago or louis armstrong and his first days of playing there. there are a lot of people going through chicago then. >> and just to affirm to my local audience -- [laughter] langston hughes, this auditorium we are in his name for langston hughes and he certainly spent many many years here at the schomberg library doing research and doing original pieces of work there are collection so we certainly have benefited from his life and his legacy. chicago also had a dark side and there is a slide that i would like to turn two
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